It Was 20 Years Ago Today – Fibromyalgia

Liddypool: Birthplace of The Beatles by David Bedford
Liddypool: Birthplace of The Beatles by David Bedford

It was 20 years ago today (almost) that, after being treated for rheumatoid arthritis for 2 years I went to see my doctor as I was ill yet again. He signed me off for 1 month. A month? That is ridiculous. But he was right. He hadn’t been trying to tell me for a few months that I couldn’t keep working like I was doing. I was a physical wreck. I hadn’t slept well for over 18 months, was constantly tired, my body was aching and I couldn’t think straight. That was June 2000 and I never returned to work again.

Fibro-my-what?

I was another 12 months before I was properly diagnosed. The consultant who had been treating me since September 1998 for rheumatoid arthritis was wrong. A second opinion from another consultant re-diagnosed me in less than 30 minutes. He told me I had fibromyalgia. Eh? Never heard of it!

YNWA – You’ll Never Work Again

My doctor told me straight, having been off work for 12 months already, that I would not be returning to work. I was, by then, 36 with three young children. Retiring at 36 sounds ideal, but I had worked since leaving school and was suddenly unable to work.

What is Fibromyalgia?

I am still learning about it all these years later. It is a syndrome which means that there are a collection of symptoms gathered together under the one umbrella term of fibromyalgia. The definition is fibro= fibrous tissues of the body, my=muscles, algia=pain.

The definition is given as: “A rheumatic condition characterized by muscular or musculoskeletal pain with stiffness and localised tenderness at specific points on the body.”

Main symptoms of the condition are:

1. Chronic fatigue

2. Joint pain, stiffness and disorders

3. IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome)

4. Poor circulation and tingling in peripheries especially fingers and toes

5. Forgetfulness – short-term memory especially

6. Sleep disturbance

7. Lack of concentration

What I have learned over the years is that everybody who suffers with fibromyalgia has a variation in the symptoms.

My Fibromyalgia

What this means is that I have chronic pain in every muscles and joint in my body, 24/7, 365 days a year. However, the rheumatism aggravates it when it is just damp or raining. This causes every joint in my body to ache even more than it does usually.

One of the biggest changes was going from playing football, cricket and golf to not being able to walk 50 yards without pain in less than 2 years. That was a dramatic change to my life.

I haven’t had a good night’s sleep since the summer of 1998 – that is not an exaggeration either. I have tablets to help me sleep every night, but I never feel that I have had a good night’s sleep and always wake with a “hangover”.

I take about 16 tablets a day to keep me going and, after a while, you gain a tolerance to the pain, because you just get used to living with it. The associated conditions for me are generalised arthritis in my joints, diabetes (type 2) and high blood pressure, which all developed with the fibromyalgia.

The Cure?

There isn’t one! All they can do is treat the symptoms, hence the tablets.

Prescribing The Beatles

My doctor, the late Peter Griffiths, was an amazing support with coming to terms with living with fibromyalgia. He told me look for something that interested me and finding a new way to spend my day. It was then that I started writing about The Beatles and Liverpool for the London Beatles Fan Club, which became The British Beatles Fan Club, for whom I still write. Dr Griffiths encouraged me to pursue that, which got me out of the house and engaged mentally in following this as a hobby. It wasn’t until 2007 that I got a publishing deal for my first book, that became Liddypool. Little did I know how much that would change my life.

I loved the process of researching and writing Liddypool, so I wrote The Fab One Hundred and Four: The Evolution of The Beatles, again to critical acclaim. By now I was being invited to Beatles conventions in the UK and US especially. Amazing. I have jointly published a book with Beatles Biographer Hunter Davies, Finding the Fourth Beatle and working on 4 book projects at the moment. I was also engaged as the historian and Associate Producer for the documentary, Looking for Lennon. What a privilege.

Living with Fibromyalgia

So I still live with fibromyalgia and that is not going to change. Many people now know more about the condition than they did 20 years ago, though I am still learning about it. Celebrities like Morgan Freeman and Lady Gaga have helped to raise the profile of the condition, though there is still so much ignorance surrounding it, especially among the medical profession, which is tough.

BUT! I have made so many friends through having fibromyalgia and we help each other. That support is essential because it is a hard condition to describe. You can’t show somebody an x-ray, a blood test, a scan, to prove you have the condition. There is no physical test you can show anybody that says you have fibromyalgia.

Family and Friends

The support of my wife Alix, my daughters and extended family have been invaluable. I could not have done it without them. It also sorted out who those genuine friends were, because they were the ones who stood by me. Again, that has been invaluable. I have had so much encouragement and support it is truly humbling. Don’t be afraid to reach out.

Positives

if I hadn’t fallen ill and had to give up work, I would never have become an Beatles historian, author and researcher. I LOVE what I do. It has become my therapy and the best way to deal with a condition like fibromyalgia. I can do what I want, when I am able, and rest when I need to rest. Sometimes I over do it, and that knocks me out for a few days. But there is hope, if you are a sufferer too.

The End

As some Liverpool band once sang; “And in the end, the love you take, is equal to the love you make”.

All You Need Is Love – and a pocketful of pills too!

Useful Links

More information about fibromyalgia from the NHS is here

Help and support is available from charities like Fibromyalgia UK

How Little Richard Inspired The Beatles

Long Tall Sally by Little Richard
Long Tall Sally by Little Richard

With the news of the sad death of Little Richard, what was the true impact of this rock ‘n’ roll icon?

Long Tall Sally

“Long Tall Sally” by Little Richard was covered so many times over the years, but it was especially important to John Lennon, which is featured in a fantastic book by Michael Hill.

John Lennon: The Boy Who Became A Legend
John Lennon: The Boy Who Became A Legend

A few years ago, some friends of mine told me about Michael’s story and how it should be published, as it was such a good story. I was therefore more than happy to help it get published. His book, “John Lennon, The Boy Who Became A Legend“, tells the story of how Michael bought “Long Tall Sally” on a school trip to Amsterdam, brought it back to Liverpool and played it for John Lennon at Michael’s home. John’s reaction was silence, followed by an incredible quote:

John Lennon on Long Tall Sally

“Little Richard was one of the all-time greats. The first time I heard him, a friend of mine (Mike Hill) had been to Holland and brought back a 78 with ‘Long Tall Sally’. That’s the music that brought me from the provinces of England to the world. That’s what made me what I am.”

Michael’s story is unique, having been a friend of John’s from the age of 5 at Dovedale School continuing through Quarry Bank too. I recommend the book, which you can get here.

Long Tall Sally and The Beatles

The Beatles with Little Richard
The Beatles with Little Richard at New Brighton Tower Ballroom

The song features at some many important events throughout Beatles history. When Paul auditions for John on 6th July 1957 at the Woolton Fete, Paul performed some of “Long Tall Sally”. On the stages of Hamburg, it was an important part of their set.

When The Beatles returned from Hamburg in 1960, their iconic performance at Litherland Town Hall began with “Long Tall Sally”. When The Beatles travel to America in February 1964, they perform “Long Tall Sally”. At their last concert at Candlestick Park on 29th August 1966, their final song was “Long Tall Sally”. The song, in a way, defines The Beatles career.

Little Richard was a true rock ‘n’ roll hero for The Beatles and the rest of the world too.

When I Met Little Richard

I had the quite unexpected privilege of seeing Little Richard in person when I travelled to Memphis and Nashville a few years ago. I had heard that he was living in the Hilton Hotel in Nashville. I had checked my suitcase into the Hilton while I was sightseeing, before heading to Memphis.

When I checked my bag out, the door of the hotel opened, and in came Little Richard! I was dumbstruck, which doesn’t often happen. He was now in a wheelchair, but wearing a smart three-piece suit and tie, being pushed in his chair. I looked at him and he just looked up and smiled, so I smiled too and then he was wheeled away. I had seen one of my musical heroes close up. If only had the presence of mine to speak to him, but I was so shocked at seeing him I was unable to speak!

Little Richard will forever be connected with the birth of rock ‘n’ roll and The Beatles.

David Bedford

The Beatles Bookstore

The Beatles Bookstore
The Beatles Bookstore

Just Launched

So, if you haven’t seen it yet, I have launched a new website last week called The Beatles Bookstore. It is a collaboration between Beatles authors to support each other, and to showcase out books to the world!

We have author pages for each of the authors signed up and there are already nearly 30 books in the store.

Covid-19 Social Distancing

In the current climate, there are so few stores open and all the Beatles festivals have been cancelled, so this is a great opportunity for us authors to, hopefully, sell our books!

Free Book!

Just for singing up at The Beatles Bookstore you will be entered into a draw to win a signed copy of my book, “The Fab on Hundred and Four” for the month of May 2020.

Open 8 Days A Week

Please share the link and spread the word – The Beatles Bookstore is open 8 Days a Week!

www.beatlesbookstore.com

Thanks for the support

David Bedford

Discover the UNTOLD story of the Country Roots of The Beatles in my NEW book

The Country of Liverpool
The Country of Liverpool

John Lennon said:

“There is the biggest Country & Western following in England in Liverpool… I heard Country & Western music in Liverpool before I heard rock ‘n’ roll.” 

* Discover the Country music scene in Liverpool from the 1950s

* The Country roots of The Beatles

* The Phil Brady story

You can PRE-ORDER the book now: The Country of Liverpool

Discover more about the story at the official website www.thecountryofliverpool.com

Review of the book:

“In 1964, The Beatles created entire LP, Beatles for Sale, as a homage to their life-long love of country music. But how did this connection to musicians such as Carl Perkins begin? It began in The Country of Liverpool! And here, in exciting and accurate detail, David Bedford walks us through the Liverpool-link to The Beatles’ country and western vibes. Known for his detailed research and passion for “getting things right,” Bedford unfolds yet another dimension in The Beatles’ story that has long been overlooked. This book is a must-read for Beatles fans and scholars alike. I loved it!”

Jude Kessler, author of the John Lennon Series

The Country of Liverpool – The New Book

The Country of Liverpool
The Country of Liverpool

– Discover the Country music scene in Liverpool in the ’60s

– The Country roots of The Beatles

– The story of Phil Brady, former No.1 country artist in the UK

PRE-ORDER NOW

  • Signed, numbered Limited Edition hardback
  • 360 pages in full colour
  • Unique and rare photos of The Beatles
  • Phil Brady’s incredible scrapbook
  • Exclusive interviews

British Beatles Fan Club

British Beatles Fan Club
The British Beatles Fan Club

London Beatles Fan Club

The very first time I had written an article about The Beatles that was published, was in the magazine of the London Beatles Fan Club, back in 2000. I told the story of how Yoko Ono had given a substantial donation to Dovedale School, where John Lennon and George Harrison had attended, and I was a parent. I was thrilled that I had an article published and so I began writing regularly for them.

British Beatles Fan Club

A few years later, the LBFC became the British Beatles Fan Club and I am still contributing to the quarterly magazine to this day.

Membership

Why not become a member? You can JOIN HERE

Magazine

The British Beatles Fan Club Magazine is a glossy, full colour, 40 page publication which comes out 4 times a year. It is packed with fascinating and thoroughly researched articles on all aspects of the Fab Four past and present. We give you an insight into the Beatles’ career and their associates in Liverpool, London and throughout the world.

British Beatles Fan Club magazine
British Beatles Fan Club magazine

Regular features include:

Upcoming Events—organised by the club and anything else relating to the Beatles, including festivals, Beatles Days, concerts and conventions throughout the world

Beatles A Day In The Life—a day-by-day diary

Media Watch

Reviews of the latest releases

Classified Ads

Concert and event reviews

In-depth articles

Letters from members

The Legendary Crap Photos of the Month


Plus:
Comprehensive feature articles on every Beatle subject imaginable!
High quality colour and black & white Beatles photos throughout the magazine!

About The British Beatles Fan Club

The British Beatles Fan Club (BBFC) is run by fans for fans. We currently have over 800 members and bring together Beatles enthusiasts from the UK and across the world.  We publish a highly esteemed quarterly magazine and organise Beatles related events in the London and Liverpool areas and across the UK.  We also have several active online communities, including a Yahoo group, Facebook and Twitter for keeping up to date with the latest news and in touch with other fans

On the website, our aim is to bring you some of the latest news about the Beatles, information about events and attractions, competitions, and reviews. The website is enabled to allow comments, so please tell us what you like (and don’t like!), and if there’s anything you’d like to see featured here. All comments go through moderation, so please don’t worry if there’s a delay between submitting a comment and publication. However, please note, you MUST sign all comments. Anonymous comments will not be approved.

Also, we’d love you to contribute! For example, if you attend any Beatles-related event (a concert by a tribute band for instance), or visit a Beatles attraction, please share your experiences with other BBFC members and Beatle fans. Send any contributions to website@britishbeatlesfanclub.co.uk

Find Out More

The website is at www.britishbeatlesfanclub.co.uk

Join us on FACEBOOK

David Bedford

“Modern Drummer” Magazine Reviews “Finding the Fourth Beatle”

Finding the Fourth Beatle
Finding the Fourth Beatle

Finding the Fourth Beatle has received many fantastic reviews from fans and magazines too. Below is the review from Modern Drummer magazine, who liked our book and also the great book, Ringo’s White Album, by Alex Cain and Terry McCusker (experts in our book too).

“For those who must consume every morsel of Beatles history, Finding the Fourth Beatle by David Bedford and Garry Popper will sate even the thirstiest fanatics.”

“It’s maddening minutiae for some, nirvana for others”

Get your copy now. And don’t forget the Double CD too.

David Bedford

The Beatles Decca Audition Part 2

The Beatles Decca tapes
The Beatles Decca Audition on vinyl

If you missed it, Decca Audition Part 1

The Audition

The Beatles knew it was one of the most important dates of their lives; they still thought they could clown around as if they were in The Cavern. According to George Harrison, they even “put on heavy, thicker-than-usual Liverpool accents to try and fool the Londoners. It was a bit of a defence mechanism.” (True Story of The Beatles) 

John Lennon would later say that “somehow this helped get our spirits up again.” Still, despite their best efforts, they were unable to recreate the energy and atmosphere of their Liverpool and Hamburg shows. Johnrecalled: “Remember that we had at the back of our minds that Brian Eppie had spent a lot of time already trying to get record companies interested in us, but without having any luck. I guess that was weighing on our minds.” (True Story of The Beatles)   

As if all these pressures were not bad enough, tensions soon rose to the breaking point when Epstein’s sense of self-importance tripped him up once again. Dismissing normal studio protocol, he interrupted he proceedings and immediately got into an open altercation with John Lennon. Oops!

John Lennon and Brian Epstein – A Fair Fight?

The red mist descended over Lennon faster than a rainstorm. Pete Best: “…Brian began to voice some criticism either of John’s singing or his guitar playing. I’m not sure which. Lennon burst into one of his bouts of violent, uncontrollable temper, during which his face would alternate from white to red. ‘You’ve got nothing to do with the music!’ he raged. ‘You go back and count your money, you Jewish git!’” The sudden chill in the studio was far icier than the weather outside. “Brian looked like he had cracked down the middle. Mike Smith, the sound engineers and the rest of us all looked at each other in amazement.” (Beatle!) 

Brian wisely walked away from the confrontation. This was likely the first time he experienced a very public tongue-lashing from the often cruel tongue of John Lennon.  It wouldn’t be the last, and the fact that it happened at a crucial audition at Decca studios of all places shocked everyone watching. Not the best way to sell yourself.

Would You Have Signed The Beatles?

The final order of the songs performed at the session is not known, but by the end they had managed to record 15 numbers, all live, with little or no opportunity to correct mistakes. Time was up.

Now, decades later, we ask you to put yourself in Dick Rowe’s position. After all the feedback on the day’s events, having listened to the session tapes, and knowing the comparisons and options concerning Brian Poole and the Tremeloes, Rowe had to make a straightforward commercial business decision whether to sign The Beatles or not. There was no crystal ball where he could gaze into the future; nor did he have the luxury of looking back in hindsight.

With that in mind, and based on the known facts, what would you have decided? Would you have signed The Beatles?

Blame it on the Drummer – A Convenient Scapegoat?

Beatles drummer Pete Best
Beatles drummer Pete Best

These Decca auditions have been cited over the years as proof of Pete Best’s poor drumming and one of the reasons why he had to go. “Worst of all was Pete’s drumming,” and “At Decca, Pete had the full kit at his disposal and did little with it.” (Tune In). But is there any basis in this assessment?

Examining Third Party Opinions: Is Criticism Valid as Evidence?

Writing for Ultimate Classic Rock, Dave Lifton also condemns Best’s drumming. “The tapes prove George Martin’s assertion that Pete Best was the wrong drummer for the group. For years, Best had said he was fired in favour of Ringo Starr because the band were jealous of his success with their female fans. But after one listen, it’s obvious that Best was a limited drummer with a poor sense of timekeeping.”

Savage Opinion

“I thought Pete Best was very average, and didn’t keep good time. You could pick up a better drummer in any pub in London,” recalled Decca session engineer Mike Savage in a 2007 interview. (TuneIn) 

Very average and didn’t keep good time? A better drummer in any pub in London? These emotive words condemn Best as a drummer; Savage’s words are savage. In context, Mike Savage was the 20-year-old junior assistant to producer Mike Smith back in 1962. “If you’ve got a quarter of a group being very average, that isn’t good,” (Tune In) he continued. Granted, this is a fair comment. 

However, an analysis of the songs will demonstrate that the whole audition was average at best. Applying the scholastic tests, theavage quote, the first by him was given 45 years after the original session, goes against the testimony by many ‘60s-era Liverpool musicians who describe Pete as a very good drummer. There is also no independent corroboration of these comments, and nobody else from Decca, including Mike Smith, commented on Pete’s drumming. We will examine Best’s drumming ability track by track to see if Savage’s assessment holds up.

Analysis by Drummers

For our analysis of the Decca session, we invited three drummers to listen to the audition songs, each for the first time ever. The analysts, which include a father-and-son team, are:

Mike Rice, drummer with ‘60s Merseybeat band The Senators who was an active drummer until recently, and saw both Pete and Ringo play with The Beatles.

Mike Rice (second from left)
Mike Rice (second from left) from ’60s group The Senators

Derek Hinton, 50, a guitarist and bassist in bands for over 30 years and an accomplished drummer as well.  

Derek Hinton
Drummer Derek Hinton

Derek’s son Andrew Hinton, 19, an excellent drummer, bass guitarist and lead guitarist who is currently pursuing a music degree at Liverpool University.

Drummer Andrew Hinton
Drummer Andrew Hinton, one of our experts

Each participant was played the song only once, and was then asked for his immediate feedback on Pete’s drumming as if they were at the session.

Here is a selection from the book, Finding the Fourth Beatle, where we examined all 15 songs. You can also find every track in the Decca audition on our Finding the Fourth Beatles double-CD.

1. Money (That’s What I Want)

John launched into a rocking version of “Money (That’s What I Want)”, a 1960 hit for Barrett Strong on the Tamla label. Written by Tamla founder Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford, it became the first hit record for Gordy’s Motown label, whose roster included all the great American pop-soul artists The Beatles worshipped. John seems to be almost croaking, or trying too hard to sound like a rock ‘n’ roller, and overdoes the vocals. Though John’s voice is too raspy, Pete’s atom beat is strong and Paul’s solid bass-playing augments the strong drum rhythm.

This song was later recorded for EMI and issued on their second LP, With The Beatles.

Pete’s drumming? 

Mike: “Couldn’t hear Pete enough because the balance isn’t too good between the instruments. Pete’s timing is good and he is playing the correct rhythm for the song, using his bass and floor tom well. Nothing wrong with his drumming.”  

Derek and Andrew: “Very good use of the full kit. Very tight and a good tempo all the way through. Drumming is fast and at a good pace with good syncopation.”

3. “To Know Her Is to Love Her

“To Know Him Is to Love Him” was written by Phil Spector, inspired by words on his father’s tombstone, “To Know Him Was To Love Him”. It was first recorded by Spector’s group, the Teddy Bears, and it went to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 1958. The Beatles’ version was not officially released until 1994, when it appeared on their Live at the BBC compilation album. The song is in 12/8 time. John’s lead vocal is good, though lacking in the quality we would expect, while the backing harmonies from Paul and George are perfect. Guitars, bass and drums all work together. This is possibly one of the best tracks of the day.

Never recorded by The Beatles with EMI, the song was performed for the BBC and a version was released on Live At The BBC.

Pete’s drumming?

Mike: “I would have added something slightly different, personally, when they go in to ‘Why can’t she see…….’, but that is still good, and the beat is good and regular, and he makes a good transition back into ‘To know, know, know her…’, so I’ve no real criticisms.”  

Derek and Andrew: “The timing on the hi-hat is like a metronome, it is that good and regular. He is playing almost freestyle, playing to the song – not just sticking to a set rhythm. He emphasises the melody and song, and doesn’t have a set part to play which is very creative. Maybe needs a little variation with his use of the snare and the ride cymbal.”

4. “Take Good Care of My Baby

One of the best songs in the day’s repertoire, “Take Good Care of My Baby” came from the famous songwriting team of Carole King and Gerry Goffin. Bobby Vee’s hit version was released in America July 1961 and by September, it had reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. In The Beatles’ version, George’s vocal is superb, with John and Paul harmonising with him brilliantly; the group sounds tight.

Not recorded by The Beatles for EMI, the song was performed for the BBC and appeared on Live At The BBC.

Pete’s drumming?

Mike: “Clean and clear sound, Pete’s rhythm is the right one and nicely in time. Good performance.”

Derek and Andrew: “The drumming is very tight, and has a good, consistent tempo. He uses a simpler pattern and rhythm, appropriate for the song. He stops perfectly in time with the rest of the group; the whole group performs this song perfectly. The drumming is holding the group together, and leading from the back. He is very inventive, using a different rhythm for each song, whereas most drummers would just do the same for each song.”

7. “Crying, Waiting, Hoping

There had to be a Buddy Holly composition included, and they chose “Crying, Waiting, Hoping” a song released in 1959 as the B-side to “Peggy Sue Got Married”. There are actually three versions of Holly’s song: the 1959 release, the 1964 reissue with different orchestration, and Holly’s original home recording.

The Beatles’ Decca version featured George Harrison on lead vocal whilst replicating studio guitarist Donald Arnone’s instrumental bridge note for note. Everything about the song is great. George’s vocal is once again the pick of the session, and the balance of the group’s rhythm is very good.

The number was never an official EMI release by The Beatles, until it appeared on Live At The BBC.

Pete’s drumming?

Mike: “Nice rhythm, good drum rolls at the right place, and variation in the chorus, too. A good performance and sounded great.”

Derek and Andrew: “Again, Pete’s drum rolls are excellent. More variety in his choice of rhythm, with good variation on the snare drum. He is playing a standard 4/4 time signature but with a samba variation. This is where he is listening to the group and playing the song well. It is inventive and precise, with perfect patterns. Stunning performance by Pete, and this is probably the best the whole group has sounded together. They all know what they are doing.”

14. “Three Cool Cats 

“Three Cool Cats” was a 1958 song written by Leiber and Stoller. It was originally recorded by The Coasters and released as the B-side of their hit single, “Charlie Brown”. The Beatles performed this song several times during the infamous Get Back/ Let It Be sessions in January 1969.

Another fine vocal performance from George with supporting harmonies from John and Paul, whose interludes are characterized by very dodgy foreign accents. These odd dialects, though well-suited for a live Cavern show, spoil an otherwise impressive group performance with tight vocals, guitars and drums.

First released on Anthology 1, this is The Beatles’ only recording of a great song.

Pete’s drumming?

Mike: “He varied the beat at the right time – better variation – and kept a good tempo. No problem with his drumming there.”

Derek and Andrew: “Again, Pete adds his signature drum roll to perfection, and sounds really good. He uses great variety in the chorus with his use of the snare. Good variety in the lead guitar solo to back up what George is doing. Again, drumming is very tight with the group.”

And In The End? Conclusions from The Decca Audition

The Studio:

Steve Levine has been a successful record producer for many years, and was a good friend of George Martin. He has a unique insight into the recording environment and technology The Beatles would have used in 1962. For him, the whole process of stepping into a recording studio for the first time was a significant factor. Read Steve’s comments in the book.

The Drummer?

Did our expert drummers agree with Savage’s comments about Pete’s drumming being “very average, and didn’t keep good time. You could pick up a better drummer in any pub in London”?   

“I don’t know who these people are who criticise Pete’s drumming because he was a great drummer,” said Mike Rice. “He was fantastic to see live with The Beatles and his sound drove the group forward.” (DB interview 2015)

As Derek observed: “Pete’s timekeeping was like a metronome, and at times, it came across as if it was the drummer who was the leader of the group, like a Buddy Rich. In fact, Pete’s drumming reminds me of ‘Wipeout’ by the Ventures, with that great use of the floor tom and that pounding rhythm that drives the song.” It’s noteworthy that both The Ventures’ and Safaris’ versions of “Wipeout” didn’t come out until 1963, a year later.

Andrew notes: “Considering Pete had no training, he is very creative and he was creating sounds and rhythms for the first time. He knows what he is doing, is confident in his ability, and isn’t simply copying the records or original version.”

Derek concluded that Pete “is doing something different on virtually every song, and almost playing like the “Prog Rock” drummers were doing in the 1970s.”

“We Wouldn’t Have Used Pete Best” Really?

Junior Engineer Mike Savage commented further on Pete’s drumming: “If Decca was going to sign The Beatles, we wouldn’t have used Pete Best on the records.” (Tune In) 

Interestingly, the only comments we have from Savage pertain only to Pete’s drumming. But what did he think about John, Paul and George? Why do we not have those comments? Neither session producer Mike Smith nor Dick Rowe singled out Pete for particular criticism – the recordings reveal that, at various times, they were all culpable. However, as we will see in a later chapter on the use of session drummers, it wouldn’t have mattered how well Pete Best did that day, because you could virtually guarantee that Decca or Parlophone were going to use a session drummer. That was no insult to Pete, or later, to Ringo.

Mike Smith at Decca

When asked about the Decca audition in the February 2002 issue of The Beatles Monthly, Smith said: “Maybe I should have trusted my instincts and signed them on the strength of their stage show. In the studio they were not good and their personalities didn’t come across. Maybe they were in awe of the situation. Of course I kicked a lot of furniture in the year or two afterwards when The Beatles started to happen for George Martin over at EMI. I would like to have auditioned the group when they had a better range of songs to offer, but NOT after they fired Pete Best. In my humble opinion he was a better drummer than Ringo.”

Smith added that “the one that played the most bum notes was McCartney. I was very unimpressed with what was happening with the bassline.” But he also wanted to qualify that observation, reminding us that “we are talking about four young men in a very strange environment, probably a very overpowering environment.” (Best of the Beatles) This is a fair comment to make about four young men entering a professional recording studio for the first time. It should come as no surprise that they were all affected by nerves. It is only natural.

Decca Sign Pete Best

Mike Savage: “If Decca was going to sign The Beatles, we wouldn’t have used Pete Best on the records.” How ironic that, just over a year later, Decca signed the second-most popular group in Liverpool, Lee Curtis and the All-Stars, whose drummer was, of course, Pete Best. Did they use a session drummer? No. It is also clear from what Smith has said that he was happy with Pete Best, and so he would not support the comments by Savage.

Pete Best in New York with his own band
Pete Best in New York, now with his own band

Decca released two singles, “Little Girl” and “Let’s Stomp” but, unfortunately, neither made the charts. In mid-1963, the rest of the band decided to split from Curtis to form The Original All-Stars. That group became The Pete Best Four, who were also signed by Decca and produced by none other than Mike Smith. And again, no session drummer was used. The Pete Best Four and Pete Best Combo released several singles and albums. But despite Pete’s profile and the songwriting talents of Wayne Bickerton and Tony Wadsworth, success eluded them.

As a former member of Pete’s group, Bickerton was asked about his drumming. “Pete was a good drummer,” Bickerton said. “All the stories of him not being able to play properly are grossly exaggerated. The problem he fought against was being an ex-Beatle, which worked against us. The talent was in the band, but it was secondary to the Beatle-obsessed media and public.” (Spencer Leigh Let’s Go Down To The Cavern) 

In The End?

The Beatles failed the Decca audition as a group, with no single member to blame, be it Pete Best, John Lennon, Paul McCartney or George Harrison. This failed audition could have been the end of the road for The Beatles, not just for Pete.

Brian, however, was not prepared to give up just yet. He took the boys out for a meal and tried to cheer them up. “The boys performed like real troopers when I stressed that this was only the beginning, not the end,” Brian said. “I knew how disappointed and fed up they were.” He felt he had let his boys down, but it was a learning experience for them all.

Thankfully, Decca turned The Beatles down, which meant they got the chance to work with George Martin; a perfect partnership. That Parlophone audition went ok, even if it wasn’t a perfect performance.

David Bedford

Finding the Fourth Beatle CD
Finding the Fourth Beatle CD

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